US Quantum Computing Theory CS Hires?

I’m trying to put together a list of people who have been hired in the United States universities in CS departments who do theoretical quantum computing over the last decade. So the requirements I’m looking for are (a) hired into a tenure track position in a US university with at least fifty percent of their appointment in CS, (b) hired after 2001, and (c) they would say their main area of research is quantum information science theory.

Here is my current list:

  • Scott Aaronson (MIT)
  • P. Oscar Boykin (University of Florida, Computer Engineering)
  • Amit Chakrabarti (Dartmouth)
  • Vicky Choi (Virginia Tech)
  • Hang Dinh (Indiana University South Bend)
  • Sean Hallgren (Penn State)
  • Alexei Kitaev (Caltech)
  • Andreas Klappernecker (Texas A&M)
  • Igor Markov (Michigan)
  • Yaoyun Shi (Michigan)
  • Wim van Dam (UCSB)
  • Pawel Wocjan (UCF)

Apologies to anyone I’ve missed! So who have I missed? Please comment!

Update: Steve asks for a similar list in physics departments. Here is my first stab at such a list…though it’s a bit harder because the line between quantum computing theorist, and say, AMO theorist who studies systems that might be quantum computing is difficult.

Physicists, quantum computing theory,

  • Lorenza Viola (Dartmouth)
  • Stephen van Enk (Oregon)
  • Alexei Kitaev (Caltech)
  • Paolo Zanardi (USC)
  • Mark Byrd (Southern Illinois University)
  • Luming Duan (Michigan)
  • Kurt Jacobs (UMass Boston)
  • Peter Love (Haverford)
  • Jon Dowling (LSU)

I’m sure I missed a lot hear, please help me fill it in.

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15 Responses to US Quantum Computing Theory CS Hires?

  1. Dave Bacon says:

    Yeah, I can try, though physics is a bit harder. Where is the line between, say AMO and quantum computing?

  2. John Sidles says:

    I would be interested in a parallel category of industrial hires.

    Here the point is that (historically) STEM ecosystems require for long-term stability a ratio (very roughly)    (industrial effort)/(academic effort) ≥ ~5A natural question is “What is the strongest case that can be made for ramping-up QIT’s industrial sector?”

  3. John Sidles says:

    Sorry for the bad formatting … it looked fine in preview! Let’s try again.

    —————–

    I would be interested in a parallel category of industrial hires.

    Here the point is that (historically) STEM ecosystems require for long-term stability a ratio (very roughly)

       (industrial effort)/(academic effort) â‰¥ ~5.

    A natural question is “What is the strongest case that can be made for ramping-up QIT’s industrial sector?”

  4. dabacon says:

    Thanks David and Anonymous!

    John, what threshold of positions for industry should I use? I would think > postdoc would be relevant. And what about national lab positions, is that industry?

  5. John Sidles says:

    Dave, you are asking tough questions, to which I cannot offer perfect answers … it seems that the boundaries between institutions are blurring as thoroughly as the boundaries between mathematical formalisms, academic disciplines, and even between nations.

  6. NE1 says:

    Lorenza Viola @ Dartmouth?

  7. Steve Flammia says:

    @NE1, Lorenza is in the physics department.

    @Dave, can you make a new list, just below the current one? Same rules, but physics departments instead of CS.
    (Do I even want to know? 🙂

  8. David Meyer says:

    Peter Love in the Physics Department at Haverford, although he works on other things as well as theoretical quantum computing.

  9. Steve Flammia says:

    Stephen Jordan and I were discussing… we think that maybe you could lump in people with appointments in EE as CS, and Chemistry as Physics. So, this would let you add Brun, Lidar, Aspuru-Guzik, and maybe others.

  10. John Sidles says:

    Hmmm … a parallel question to Dave’s (only two words changed!) is this one: “I’m trying to put together a list of people who have been hired in the United States universities in the 1980s who do theoretical quantum chromodynamics.”

    The answer would be “few relative to PhD degrees granted” … and yet, the overall theoretical enterprise associated to quantum dynamics survived (and even expanded and prospered).

  11. Bill Kaminsky says:

    Vicky Choi moved from D-Wave to an assistant professorship in CS at Virginia Tech roughly 3 years ago (IIRC).

    Here’s Vicky’s website: http://people.cs.vt.edu/~vchoi/

    (I never asked her if it was tenure-track, but I assume all “assistant professors” at Virginia Tech are… note that she works only part of the time on adiabatic quantum computation, the other part on bioinformatics stuff)

  12. Bill Kaminsky says:

    (Addendum to above: But Vicky lists quantum computation as her first research interest on her website.)

  13. arno says:

    @Dave,I wonder whether you can list a number of faculty in EE. It sounds like that there are quite a lot of people doing research in that area, such as quantum communication?
    I would appreciate it if you can do that for me.

  14. waterson78 says:

    I

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